Frequently Asked Questions

Questions & Answers

Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. … U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one nationality or another. A U.S. citizen may naturalize in a foreign state without any risk to his or her U.S. citizenship.

Acquiring a second citizenship is more about the process of getting to that dual citizenship status. This can usually be done through three common ways: descent, fast track naturalisation, and citizenship by investment programs.

Your residency status abroad has no effect on your U.S. citizenship. … The only way to lose your U.S. citizenship is to renounce it formally. You can’t lose your U.S. citizenship accidentally.

The US allows dual nationality — which means Americans are mostly free to apply for dual citizenship in other countries. Most citizenship-application processes can be intensive, expensive, and time-consuming. But some nations have policies that make it easier than others to obtain citizenship.

Assuming that you retain your U.S. citizenship, having citizenship from another country would have no effect on your Social Security benefits or options.

Dual citizens are people who hold the citizenship for two countries at once. If you have dual citizenship in the US and another country, that means you can hold two valid passports at once.

The only important thing is to enter and exit a country with the same passport and to obviously show, in your home countries, your home country passport. The immigration officers usually do not care how many passports you carry, they only care that the passport you are showing to him/her are valid for entry / exit.

If you are a U.S. citizen and qualify for Social Security, you can receive payments while living in most other countries. … To check on your eligibility to receive benefits in a foreign country, you can: Use Social Security’s online screening tool for international payments.

The general rule of thumb for dual nationals going to one of their countries is enter and exit on that country’s passport. Dual national US citizens must use their US passport when entering and leaving the United States, which after all makes sense: You’re an American leaving, or returning to, America.

If you have moved outside the United States permanently, you should decide whether to keep Medicare Parts A and B. Remember, you can have Medicare while you live abroad, but it will usually not cover the care you receive. Most people qualify for premium-free Part A, meaning you will pay nothing for coverage.

U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one nationality or another. A U.S. citizen may naturalize in a foreign state without any risk to his or her U.S. citizenship. … They are required to obey the laws of both countries, and either country has the right to enforce its laws.

Bank of America explained that it was required to ask the question to comply with Treasury regulations. … Under a separate law, foreign banks must collect citizenship information from Americans, ostensibly in order to track down potential tax-dodgers.

By far the cheapest deal for citizenship is on the tiny Caribbean island of Dominica. For an investment of $100,000 plus various fees, as well as an in-person interview on the island, citizenship can be bought.

For individuals who are dual citizens of the U.S. and another country, the U.S. imposes taxes on its citizens for income earned anywhere in the world. If you are living in your country of dual residence that is not the U.S.you may owe taxes both to the U.S. government and to the country where the income was earned.

A second passport will provide you the lifelong benefits of having more options for living, working, investing, traveling, and doing business around the world.

In addition it offers you…

  • More Visa-Free Travel for you and your family
  • A place you can always go to (no matter what happens in your home country)
  • Added Protection from Travel and Immigration Control
  • Potentially distances you from foreign policy repercussions
  • Option to renounce your current citizenship (should not be taken lightly)

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